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Chris Cardell

Interview with Flaviu Simihaian (eval.me)

eval.me partners with charities around the world to allow companies to donate $1 to charity for every customer that completes their survey.

I interviewed Flaviu Simihaian, eval.me founder to find out more. This interview is the sixty fourth in a series of DW interviews. Big thank you to Flaviu for the interview!

How would you describe eval.me in under 50 words?

Web surveys with a heart. If you donate $1 to charity, your customers are twice as likely to complete your survey. And they get to choose the charity!

Why did you quit your job to build eval.me?

Because I want to change the world, one line of code at a time.

What technologies have you used to build eval.me?

Ruby on Rails, Backbone.js, the usual suspects.

How long did it take to put together eval.me?

4 months.

You believe that to fail is to succeed. What failures have helped you succeed?

I played tennis for 14 years every day. After college, I played professional tennis tournaments in Europe for 5 months. I did not manage to get better than 1300 in the world, and squandered all of my money travelling.

However, I had to give it a shot (and find out I am not Roger Federer). Had I not tried, I would have lived wondering what if…

Where does your interest in charity work originate from?

I originally came to the United States with the help of Rotary International, one of the largest charity organizations in the world. Through the years, I became more involved in other charity projects, and a few years ago I joined a local Rotary Club, of which I am now the president. I’ve learned what an impact a few people working together can have and want to encourage everyone to volunteer as much as they can.

What advice would you give to someone in a job but wants to start their own business?

Quit. Work. Learn.

What do you wish you’d have known 5 years ago that you know now?

That online poker is rigged.

Where do you see eval.me in 5 years time?

As a growing life-style business making a few thousand a month.

Has eval.me got the feedback and growth you expected since launch?

Somewhat. We’ve had 15 thousand hits in 8 hours, and a few hundred users. However, I am working on targeting relevant industries and more potential customers.

How much money has eval.me raised for charity so far?

$38 with a $250 coming in the next few weeks.

What is the biggest hurdle you have faced or are still facing?

Selling. I am appreciating sales skills much more than I have before and getting better at it myself.

What are you most excited about at the moment?

iOS. I am working on an iPad app so keep an eye out for that!

Can you convince the reader to start using eval.me in under 50 words?

Have you sent out a survey that few (if anyone) completed? Have you received a survey that you instinctively threw in the trash? It doesn’t have to be that way. You can enjoy taking and sending surveys. Use eval.me.

Finished reading? Check out eval.me!

This entry was posted on Thursday, February 23rd, 2012 at 7:27 pm GMT. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.



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