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DoesWhat

Interview with Matteo Alessani (Recipefy)

Recipefy is a web based social cookbook, you can share and store your recipes as well as follow other food-lovers and find recipes. I interviewed Matteo Alessani, Recipefy engineer to find out more.

This interview is the eighth in a series of interviews with people working on interesting online projects. Big thank you to Matteo for the interview! You can follow Matteo on Twitter.

How would you describe Recipefy in under 50 words?

Recipefy is an online organizer and bookmark for your recipes, your cookbook online. An easy way to share recipes between friends and discover new one around the world. You can follow and be followed, a la twitter, to get updated from people you like.

What made you decide to start working on Recipefy?

We started thinking about Recipefy after many dinners with our girlfriends. After dinner there was always the same ritual: “Mmmh, this appetizer is very good! and the cheesecake so tasty! Can you write me down the recipe?” So why not create an online cookbook to primarily share recipes between friends?

How did you come up with the name?

We started from the word “Recipe” and we added the suffix -fy which means “forming a verb denoting the process of making into”. So “Recipefy” should transmit the idea of create food from the recipe.

Recipefy is beautiful, far better designed than any of the websites I could find with a similar concept. Do you see this as your main competitive advantage? If not, what is?

We tried to keep Recipefy as simple as possible to avoid a cluttered site full of features that nobody would use. I think that this, together with a good design, should be a competitive advantage.

Building a community isn’t easy, how are you getting people on board?

We are trying to get some exposure on sites and food blogs. We also suggest users to share their recipes on social networks. I think social spread can work when the theme is food!

How long did it take to put together Recipefy?

It took two months to build the community and now we are fixing and improving features all around, as soon as users point them out.

Has Recipefy got the feedback and growth you expected since launch?

We launched Recipefy a couple of weeks ago and we have received a lot of exposure on blogs and sites. Now we have more than 400 recipes and more than 1200 cookers all over the world!

Who do you see as your target audience?

Anyone who needs to cook or likes to cook. Those who like to cook will love having an online cookbook and even those who don’t like cooking will be attracted by a friend’s recipe they tasted some days before.

Who is your biggest competitor?

Our biggest competitor is the “old paper cookbook”. We think that the hardest part will be to convert users to transfer their recipes from their handwritten book to the new online cookbook.

What is the biggest hurdle you have faced or are still facing?

Convincing a new user to write down their recipes, not only watch and cook online recipes.

Do you have any features in the pipeline?

We are thinking of introducing a very interesting feature: “Print your cookbook”.

What’s your recipe of choice?

The tasty and colorful cheesecake by Maddalena.

What are you most excited about at the moment?

Recipefy has many users signed up all over the world and they are beginning to write recipes from all countries like Iran or Brazil.

Can you convince the reader to start using Recipefy in under 50 words?

Transfer your old paper cookbook here on Recipefy and you and your friends can always use it all around the world.

Finished reading? Check out Recipefy!

This entry was posted on Wednesday, April 13th, 2011 at 11:42 am GMT. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.



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